Alexandra Jabbour

PhD candidate
Department of Political Science
Universite de Montreal

Curriculum Vitae

I am a PhD candidate in Political Science at the Université de Montréal (Canada) under the supervision of Ruth Dassonneville. I do research at the intersection of political behavior and political economy. My dissertation explores the role of local factors on citizens’ assessments of the nation’s economic performance.


alexandra.jabbour@umontreal.ca

About me

I am a PhD candidate in Political Science at the Université de Montréal(Canada) under the supervision of Ruth Dassonneville. I do research at the intersection of political behavior and political economy. My dissertation explores the role of local factors on citizens’ assessments of the nation’s economic performance. I am funded by the Fond de recherche du Québec Société et Culture (FRQSC).

I am also interested in questions on representation, responsiveness, the political consequences of housing markets and the congruence between citizens and political parties. Methodologically, I have a keen interest for causal inference, experimental methods in social sciences and smart identification strategies.

I am currently a research fellow at the Canada Research Chair in Electoral Democracy led by Ruth Dassonneville and affiliated with the Center for the Study of Democratic Citizenship.

Publications

  • [2] More ‘Europe’, Less Democracy? European Integration Does Not Erode Satisfaction with Democracy.(with Ruth Dassonneville and Michael Lewis-Beck). Conditionally accepted, Electoral studies
  • Abstract The process of European integration, through institutions such as the European Union, the Eurozone, or Schengen, implies a shift in political decision-making away from the national governments and towards international institutions. This gradual shift in the balance of power, furthermore, is increasingly debated by citizens. As a result, European integration might lead to an erosion of satisfaction with democracy in European countries. By means of a longitudinal analysis of the determinants of satisfaction with democracy in European countries, we test this expectation. We find no indication that the shift in the balance of power, and the trend towards more European integration indeed have eroded satisfaction with the functioning of (national) democracy.
  • [1] An extraordinary election? A longitudinal perspective of the Québec 2018 election. (with Jean‐François Daoust). Forthcoming at French politics.
  • Abstract

    From 1970 to 2018, either the Québec Liberal Party or the Parti Québécois won the elections in Québec. The Coalition Avenir Québec ended this long period of bipartisan alternation by winning a majority of seats in the 2018 election. Using datasets that cover five elections (2007, 2008, 2012, 2014, and 2018) over a period of 11 years, we provide a unique longitudinal perspective of citizens’ vote choice calculus. More specifically, we analyse long-term factors that are known to be crucial to make sense of electoral outcomes. Do factors such as generations, sex, attitudes towards Québec sovereignty and party identification have the same weight in voters’ calculus over time? Our results show a relative stability, but also several interesting variations, especially regarding the effect of support for Québec independence. This perspective deepens our understanding of recent political developments in Québec politics.

Under review

  • Does Social Spending Moderate Economic Voting? Revisiting the Economic Voting - Welfare State Nexus. (with Ruth Dassonneville).

Working paper

  • Static or mobile: reconsidering the measure of voter's perception of the national economy
  • Does multiple change in policy preferences lead to change in partisanship?
  • The Effect of Increased Visibility on Extreme Parties Success
  • Are parties still responsive to public opinion? (with Ruth Dassonneville and Nadjim Frechet).

Teaching

Workshop: Introduction to quantitative analysis in Stata to MA ans PhD students (McGill university - january 2020)

I have worked as teaching assistant for courses in political behavior, methodology, political economy and canadian politics. These courses include:

  • POL 3015, The Elections - Automn 2018, 2019, 2020 (Pr. R. Dassonneville)
  • POL 1100, Research Methods in Political Science - Winter 2019 (Pr. E. Lachapelle )
  • POL 3500, Canadian Political Institutions - Summer 2018 (Pr. J-F Godbout)
  • POL 1500, Politics and Economy - Automn 2017 (Pr. V. Arel-Bundock)
  • POL 1000, Political Analysis - Winter 2020 (Pr F. Merand)

  • I really like data visualizations. I make use of this website to display some graphs in the header. The current figure is a dot density map using UK Census data. It provides information on London residents aged 16 and over by their living arrangements. I used the table KS104EW from the 2011 UK Census.